Consider This from NPR The hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. New episodes six days a week, Sunday through Friday.

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Consider This from NPR

From NPR

The hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. New episodes six days a week, Sunday through Friday.

Support NPR and get your news sponsor-free with Consider This+. Learn more at plus.npr.org/considerthis

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America's allies and partners around the world are paying close attention to the U.S. presidential election. The outcome could significantly affect U.S. partnerships around the world. LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. election results will reverberate around the world

Polls – and NPR's own reporting – tell a story of many Americans fatigued by the upcoming presidential race. They're not satisfied with the choice between two men who have both already held the office of President.

The U.S. election results will reverberate around the world

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For many college-bound students, the federal financial aid process has been beset by problems. With the beginning of the academic year just a couple of months away, many students still don't have a handle on the state of their financial aid. John Lamb/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lamb/Getty Images

Federal student aid still up in the air for many

This year's college application process was supposed to get easier.

Federal student aid still up in the air for many

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Donald Trump and then Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence at the 2016 Republican National Convention. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Vice presidents can make or break a candidate. Here's how Trump is choosing

We are just weeks away from one of the biggest political events of the election campaign season: the Republican National Convention in Milwaukee.

Vice presidents can make or break a candidate. Here's how Trump is choosing

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Social media platforms are part of what the U.S. surgeon general is calling a youth mental health crisis. doble-d/Getty hide caption

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doble-d/Getty

'An unfair fight': The U.S. surgeon general declares war on social media

Vivek Murthy, U.S. surgeon general, has called attention to what he has called the 'youth mental health crisis' that is currently happening in the U.S.

'An unfair fight': The U.S. surgeon general declares war on social media

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1999 (L To R) Hilary Swank And Chloe Sevigny Star In "Boys Don'T Cry." (Photo By Getty Images) Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images/Getty Images

25 years on, 'Boys Don't Cry' remains a milestone in trans cinema

As part of his ongoing look at groundbreaking films from 1999, host Scott Detrow speaks with Kimberly Peirce, the writer-director of Boys Don't Cry.

25 years on, 'Boys Don't Cry' remains a milestone in trans cinema

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Britain's Prime Minister Rishi Sunak meets with U.S. President Joe Biden at 10 Downing Street in London, Monday, July 10, 2023. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Could the U.K. election mean an off-ramp from personality politics?

As the U.K. gears up for a July election, polls show the liberal Labour Party ahead of Prime Minister Rishi Sunak's Conservatives by a hefty margin.

Could the U.K. election mean an off-ramp from personality politics?

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Pro-Palestinian protesters walk from Columbia University down to Hunter College in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When it comes to the Israel-Gaza war, the split in opinion is generational

After the October 7 attack by Hamas on Israel that killed more than 1,100 people, President Joe Biden expressed America's backing for its Middle Eastern ally.

When it comes to the Israel-Gaza war, the split in opinion is generational

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Whether Biden or Trump wins in November will mean very different things for America's place in the world. Jim Watson/Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

What a second Biden or Trump presidency could mean for American allies and foes

America is facing two very different futures on the world stage after November.

What a second Biden or Trump presidency could mean for American allies and foes

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Michael Bommer and his wife, Anett. Robert LoCascio hide caption

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Robert LoCascio

He has cancer — so he made an AI version of himself for his wife after he dies

Michael Bommer likely only has a few weeks left to live. A couple years ago, he was diagnosed with terminal colon cancer.

He has cancer — so he made an AI version of himself for his wife after he dies

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Palestinians walk among the rubble after four hostages were rescued from Gaza in an Israeli rescue operation on Saturday. Anas Baba/NPR hide caption

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Anas Baba/NPR

Can the U.S. force a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas?

On Saturday, Israeli special forces rescued four hostages held by Hamas in Gaza, killing at least 270 Palestinians and injuring hundreds in the process.

Can the U.S. force a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas?

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