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William A. Fitzgerald and Bobby Carnavale in the film Ezra. Bleeker Street hide caption

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Bleeker Street

Hollywood flips the script in the new movie 'Ezra'

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United States Marines in Afghanistan carry colleague LCPL Jerome Hanley of Massachusetts, who was wounded in an insurgent attack to a waiting medevac helicopter in 2011. Kevin Frayer/AP hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/AP

Battlefield medicine has come a long way. But that progress could be lost

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Later this year, the FDA plans to decide whether MDMA can be used to treat PTSD Eva Almqvist/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Almqvist/Getty Images

Like the gut, microbes are important for a healthy vaginal ecosystem. Getty Images/Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Getty Images/Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library

A microbiome transplant could help people with bacterial vaginosis

Humans rely on our symbiotic relationship with good microbes—in the gut, the skin and ... the vagina. Fatima Aysha Hussain studies what makes a healthy vaginal microbiome. She talks to host Emily Kwong about her long-term transplant study that asks the question: Can one vagina help another through a microbe donation?

A microbiome transplant could help people with bacterial vaginosis

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Anti-abortion activists who describe themselves as "abolitionists" protest outside a fertility clinic in North Carolina in April 2024. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Anti-abortion hardliners want restrictions to go farther. It could cost Republicans

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This 2005 electron microscope image shows an avian influenza A H5N1 virion. On Wednesday, Michigan health officials said a farmworker has been diagnosed with bird flu, the second human case connected to an outbreak in U.S. dairy cows. Cynthia Goldsmith, Jackie Katz/CDC/AP hide caption

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Cynthia Goldsmith, Jackie Katz/CDC/AP
Hilary Fung/NPR

6 key facts about abortion laws and the 2024 election

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Earlier this year, Virginia designated July as Uterine Fibroids Awareness Month. Tatyana Antusenok/Getty Images hide caption

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Tatyana Antusenok/Getty Images

Up to 80 percent of women will have a uterine fibroid by age 50

Fibroids are benign uterine tumors. So why does it matter that the majority of people with a uterus will have one before they are 50 years old? Physician Rachell Bervell, founder of the Black OBGYN Project, explains that when symptoms arise, they can be quite serious — from extreme menstrual bleeding to fertility problems. Plus, why they're very likely to affect you or a loved one.

Up to 80 percent of women will have a uterine fibroid by age 50

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A protestor attends a Women's March rally in Phoenix, Arizona in 2022. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

The states where abortion is on the ballot in November

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Father and son are now caregiver and care recipient. Robert Turner, Sr. was cheerful even though his day started with being discharged from the hospital. Ashley Milne-Tyte for NPR hide caption

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Ashley Milne-Tyte for NPR

Black men are a hidden segment of caregivers. It's stressful but rewarding, too

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On the last full day of a Bahamas excursion, Vincent Wasney had three epileptic seizures. While being evacuated, he received a bill for expenses incurred during the cruise. Kristen Norman for KFF Health News hide caption

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Kristen Norman for KFF Health News

He fell ill on a cruise. Before he boarded the rescue boat, they handed him the bill

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Children in Nasarawa, Nigeria, hold samples of their urine specimens. Blood in the urine is a sign of Schistosomiasis, a microscopic worm that, left untreated, can damage organs as well as cause learning delays. A new pill has been developed to treat preschoolers. Wes Pope/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Wes Pope/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

A new pill cures preschoolers of a parasitic worm. Delivering it could be a challenge

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A large new study shows people who bike have less knee pain and arthritis than those who do not. PamelaJoeMcFarlane/Getty Images hide caption

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PamelaJoeMcFarlane/Getty Images

Like to bike? Your knees will thank you and you may live longer, too

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Paramedic Papinki Lebelo waits for a police escort before responding to an emergency call-out in the Red Zone neighborhood of Philippi East in Cape Town, South Africa. Due to a rise in attacks on paramedics, large parts of the city are only accessible to ambulance crews when they have a police escort. This severely delays response times. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR