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Health Care

Kennise Nevers holds her son, AJ, in her arms at home. Nevers' mother, Nancy Josey, looks on. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

The simple intervention that may keep Black moms healthier

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A billing mistake by an in-network Florida emergency room landed Sara McLin's then-4-year-old son in collections. Zack Wittman/KHN hide caption

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Zack Wittman/KHN

Pay up, kid? An ER's error sends a 4-year-old to collections

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Shannon Wright for NPR

Medical bills can cause a financial crisis. Here's how to negotiate them

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Children's flu medication was hard to come by in December 2022 as a wave of respiratory viruses spread across the country. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Karla Monterroso and Fiona Lowenstein JJ Geiger; Katherine Sheehan; photo illustration by Jesse Brown hide caption

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JJ Geiger; Katherine Sheehan; photo illustration by Jesse Brown

Surviving long COVID three years into the pandemic

It's been three years since the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. And according to the CDC, out of all the American adults who have had COVID — and that's a lot of us — one in five went on to develop long COVID symptoms. While so many are struggling with this new disease, it can be hard for people to know what to do to take care of themselves. The Long COVID Survival Guide aims to give people struggling with long COVID practical solutions and emotional support to manage their illness.

Surviving long COVID three years into the pandemic

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Samuel Camacho, a health insurance navigator with the Universal Health Care Action Network of Ohio, assists people in enrolling for or renewing Medicaid. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Medicaid renewals are starting. Those who don't reenroll could get kicked off

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Saturday announced a partnership with drugmaker Civica Rx, to offer insulin at a dramatically lower cost, during a visit to a Kaiser Permanente warehouse storing thousands of insulin drug doses in Downey, Calif., on Saturday. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

"They are thriving," says Gary Walker of his adopted children Mazzy and Ransom. The hope is that with better addiction care, more Cherokee children can remain in intact families. Brian Mann/NPR hide caption

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Brian Mann/NPR

Clinics in rural areas with fewer doctors, dentists and nurses are turning to mobile health care clinics to take care to where it's most needed. The Healthy Communities Coalition organizes a few mobile dental events each year in Lyon County, Nev. Wendy Madson/KHN hide caption

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Wendy Madson/KHN

Wanda Irving holds her granddaughter, Soleil, in front of a portrait of Soleil's mother, Shalon Irving, at her home in Sandy Springs, Ga., in 2017. Wanda is raising Soleil since Shalon died of complications due to hypertension a few weeks after giving birth. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

Maternal deaths in the U.S. spiked in 2021, CDC reports

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WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 06: Activists hit a piñata carrying empty pill bottles during a protest against the price of prescription drug costs in front of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) building on October 06, 2022 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Abortion rights advocates gather in front of the J. Marvin Jones Federal Building and Courthouse in Amarillo, Texas, on Wednesday. U.S. abortion opponents are hoping to get a national ban on a widely used abortion pill through their lawsuit against the FDA. Moises Avila/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Moises Avila/AFP via Getty Images

Federal judge in Texas hears case that could force a major abortion pill off market

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Paramedics at Ben Taub General Hospital speed a patient with a gunshot wound to the trauma team for further care. Ben Taub is the largest safety-net hospital in Houston. Gregory Smith/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregory Smith/Corbis via Getty Images

This safety-net hospital doctor treats mostly uninsured and undocumented patients

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Physicians say roughly half of all preterm births are preventable, caused by social, economic and environmental factors, as well as inadequate access to prenatal health care. ER Productions Limited/Getty Images hide caption

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ER Productions Limited/Getty Images

This April 24, 2008, file photo shows the former North American headquarters of Novo Nordisk Inc., in Plainsboro, N.J. The Danish drugmaker will start slashing some U.S. insulin prices up to 75% next year, following a path set earlier this month by rival Eli Lilly. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

Prescription drug coverage is just one part of Medicare, the federal government's health insurance program for people age 65 and over. d3sign/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Medicare is suddenly under debate again

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A veterinarian says pets have a lot to teach us about love and grief

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Millions of people take statins to reduce the risk of heart attacks, but for some the medication causes debilitating side effects. Digital Vision./Getty Images hide caption

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Got muscle pain from statins? A cholesterol-lowering alternative might be for you

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Substitute teacher Crystal Clyburn, 51, doesn't have health insurance. She got her blood pressure checked at a health fair in Sarasota, Fla. Stephanie Colombini/WUSF hide caption

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Stephanie Colombini/WUSF

High inflation and housing costs force Americans to delay needed health care

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Medical tourism numbers are on the rise in Mexico, after the practice was curtailed by COVID-19 restrictions. Here, foreign patients are seen at the hospital Oasis of Hope in Tijuana in, 2019, in Mexico's Baja California state. Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images

A vial of the Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine, Bivalent. Though the shots are free to pretty much anyone who wants one in the U.S. as long as federal stockpiles hold out, the next update of the vaccine might be costly for some people who lack health insurance. RINGO CHIU/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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RINGO CHIU/AFP via Getty Images

Moderna's COVID vaccine gambit: Hike the price, offer free doses for uninsured

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