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Demonstrators pretend to resuscitate the Earth while advocating for the 1.5 degree warming goal to survive at the COP27 U.N. Climate Summit, Nov. 16, 2022, in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Recently, Richard Trumka, the commissioner of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), suggested regulating gas stoves. A growing body of research points to health and climate risks associated with the use of gas stoves. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Seeds are seen as students at Eucalyptus Elementary School in in Hawthorne, Calif., learn to plant a vegetable garden on March 13, 2019. The U.S. supply of native seeds is currently too low to respond to climate change-related events, a new report finds. David McNew/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/AFP via Getty Images

ICARDA lab employee Bilal Inaty cuts a lentil plant in order to test it for various diseases at the ICARDA research station in the village of Terbol in Lebanon's Bekaa valley, on Dec. 21, 2022. Dalia Khamissy for NPR hide caption

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Dalia Khamissy for NPR

How ancient seeds from the Fertile Crescent could help save us from climate change

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Wind turbines, of the Block Island Wind Farm, tower over the water on October 14, 2016 off the shores of Block Island, Rhode Island. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Biden's offshore wind plan could create thousands of jobs, but challenges remain

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In this Sept. 20, 2017 file photo, electricity poles and lines lie toppled on the road after Hurricane Maria hit the eastern region of the island in Humacao, Puerto Rico. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Skiers cruise down the slopes at Snowmass ski area in Colorado. This winter has already delivered snow totals above 130% of average, but climate scientists say it will take more than one wet winter to pull the arid West out of a 23-year drought. Alex Hager/KUNC hide caption

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Alex Hager/KUNC

Why heavy winter rain and snow won't be enough to pull the West out of a megadrought

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An interview with a federal official set off a culture war fight after he suggested regulators might put stricter scrutiny on gas cooking stoves due to health concerns. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

A display of Starbucks coffee pods at a Costco Warehouse in Pennsylvania. A recent article says using coffee pods might be better for the climate, but the science is far from settled. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Yeah, actually, your plastic coffee pod may not be great for the climate

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Harold Davis, who's 29 years old, bought this truck and snowplow in the fall. Opportunities to use his new plow have been few and far between. Mara Hoplamazian/New Hampshire Public Radio hide caption

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Mara Hoplamazian/New Hampshire Public Radio

This snowplow driver just started his own service. But warmer winters threaten it

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How climate change is killing the world's languages

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Sibley Street, along with other residential roads were closed due to flooding from recent rain storms resulting in high water levels in Willow Creek, in Folsom, California. Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources hide caption

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Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources

California's flooding reveals we're still building cities for the climate of the past

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Marcia Straub/Getty Images

The Colorado River is imperiled, parched by droughts exacerbated by climate change. According to a 2017 study, waterflow could drop 30% by 2050 and 55% by 2100 due to greenhouse gas emissions. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The /Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The /Denver Post via Getty Images

A course correction in managing drying rivers

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Photographs by Becky Harlan/NPR; Matteo De Stefano/Getty Images; pixelfit/Getty Images; Collage by Becky Harlan/NPR

5 New Year's resolutions to reduce your carbon footprint

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