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The Hubble Space Telescope in 2009, locked in a space shuttle's cargo bay, before the final repair work ever done. NASA/JSC hide caption

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NASA/JSC

Private mission to save the Hubble Space Telescope raises concerns, NASA emails show

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A burial team in Liberia awaits decontamination after performing "safe burials" for people who died of Ebola during the 2014-15 outbreak. Strains of the virus are harbored by bats and primates. A new study looks at how human activity affects the transmission of infectious diseases like Ebola. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

In college, Amylyx cofounders Josh Cohen and Justin Klee dreamed of finding a treatment for diseases like ALS. When their drug's promise did not pan out, they pulled it voluntarily from the market. Amylyx Pharmaceuticals hide caption

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Amylyx Pharmaceuticals

Lots of drug companies talk about putting patients first — but this one actually did

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Gabi Musat/Getty Images

Why a changing climate might mean less chocolate in the future

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Jackye Lafon, who's in her 80s, cools herself with a water spray at her home in Toulouse, France during a heat wave in 2022. Older people face higher heat risk than those who are younger. Climate change is making heat risk even greater. Fred Scheiber/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Scheiber/AFP via Getty Images

Dr. Thorsten Siess shows the Impella. Annegret Hilse/Reuters hide caption

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Annegret Hilse/Reuters

He invented a successful medical device as a student. Here's his advice for new grads

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Lauren Hill, a graduate student at Cal State LA, holds a bird at the bird banding site at Bear Divide in the San Gabriel Mountains. Grace Widyatmadja/NPR hide caption

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Grace Widyatmadja/NPR

On this unassuming trail near LA, bird watchers see something spectacular

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Research shows kids who spend two hours a day outside are less likely to develop myopia. nazar_ab/Getty Images hide caption

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nazar_ab/Getty Images

Want to protect your kids' eyes from myopia? Get them to play outside

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The inside of a cell is a complicated orchestration of interactions between molecules. Keith Chambers/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Keith Chambers/Science Photo Library

AI gets scientists one step closer to mapping the organized chaos in our cells

As artificial intelligence seeps into some realms of society, it rushes into others. One area it's making a big difference is protein science — as in the "building blocks of life," proteins! Producer Berly McCoy talks to host Emily Kwong about the newest advance in protein science: AlphaFold3, an AI program from Google DeepMind. Plus, they talk about the wider field of AI protein science and why researchers hope it will solve a range of problems, from disease to the climate.

AI gets scientists one step closer to mapping the organized chaos in our cells

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Rick Slayman is pictured at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, where he became the first person to have a genetically modified pig kidney transplant. Michelle Rose/Massachusetts General Hospital hide caption

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Michelle Rose/Massachusetts General Hospital

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of a strong solar flare on May 8, 2024. The Wednesday solar flares kicked off the geomagnetic storm happening this weekend. NASA/SDO hide caption

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NASA/SDO

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of solar flares early Saturday afternoon. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says there have been measurable effects and impacts from the geomagnetic storm. Solar Dynamics Observatory hide caption

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Solar Dynamics Observatory

The huge solar storm is keeping power grid and satellite operators on edge

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When the boys spent a year in the same school, Sam did fine, but John struggled and had some noisy meltdowns. Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Jodi Hilton for NPR

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. , who is running as a third party candidate for president, made news this week for his deposition from 2012 that "a worm ... got into my brain and ate a portion of it and then died." Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

RFK Jr. is not alone. More than a billion people have parasitic worms

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Medical debt is as much a hallmark of having children as long nights and dirty diapers. The Crivilare family, Andrew, Heather and Rita, 2, are pictured at their kitchen table in Jacksonville, Ill. Neeta Satam for KFF Health News hide caption

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Neeta Satam for KFF Health News

Their first baby came with medical debt. These Illinois parents won't have another.

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Esther Nesbitt lost two of her children to drug overdoses, and her grandchildren are among more than 320,000 who lost parents in the overdose epidemic. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images
Lily Padula for NPR

Venus and Earth used to look like 'twin' planets. What happened?

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"The primary way plants communicate with each other is through a language, so to speak, of chemical gasses," journalist Zoë Schlanger says. Mohd Rasfan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mohd Rasfan/AFP via Getty Images

Plants can communicate and respond to touch. Does that mean they're intelligent?

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