Animals Animals

Animals

Reconstruction of a Lokiceratops rangiformis being surprised by a crocodilian in the 78-million-year-old swamps that would have existed in what is now northern Montana. Andrey Atuchin/Museum of Evolution hide caption

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Andrey Atuchin/Museum of Evolution

The 'i'iwi is one of Hawaii's honeycreepers, forest birds that are found nowhere else. There were once more than 50 species. Now, only 17 remain. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

The illegal wildlife trade is estimated to be a multi-billion dollar enterprise. Live animals that are caught, like this box turtle, need immediate and long-term care at facilities like The Turtle Conservancy. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR
Pelayo Salinas / CDF

A silky shark named Genie swam 17,000 miles, a record-breaking migration

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This 2005 electron microscope image shows an avian influenza A H5N1 virion. On Wednesday, Michigan health officials said a farmworker has been diagnosed with bird flu, the second human case connected to an outbreak in U.S. dairy cows. Cynthia Goldsmith, Jackie Katz/CDC/AP hide caption

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Cynthia Goldsmith, Jackie Katz/CDC/AP

Harlan Gough holds a recently collected tiger beetle on a tether. Lawrence Reeves hide caption

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Lawrence Reeves

To escape hungry bats, these flying beetles create an ultrasound 'illusion'

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A sea otter in Monterey Bay with a rock anvil on its belly and a scallop in its forepaws. Jessica Fujii hide caption

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Jessica Fujii

When sea otters lose their favorite foods, they can use tools to go after new ones

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wildestanimal/Getty Images

Sperm whale families talk a lot. Researchers are trying to decode what they're saying

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A Phoenix Herpetological Society rattlesnake class attendee moves to pick up a Western Diamondback Rattlesnake with snake tongs under the supervision of instructor Cale Morris at the Florence Ely Nelson Desert Park in Scottsdale, Arizona. Caitlin O'Hara for NPR hide caption

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Caitlin O'Hara for NPR

Cynthia Hornor poses with Nimble, the first mixed-breed dog ever to win the Westminster Kennel Club dog show's agility competition, in New York on Monday. Jennifer Peltz/AP hide caption

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Jennifer Peltz/AP

Lauren Hill, a graduate student at Cal State LA, holds a bird at the bird banding site at Bear Divide in the San Gabriel Mountains. Grace Widyatmadja/NPR hide caption

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Grace Widyatmadja/NPR

On this unassuming trail near LA, bird watchers see something spectacular

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Traveling internationally with a dog — or adopting one from abroad — just got a bit more complicated. The CDC issued new rules intended to reduce the risk of importing rabies. mauinow1/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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mauinow1/Getty Images/iStockphoto
A. Martin UW Photography/Getty Images

Sperm whales have lengthy exchanges, made up of clicks, which scientists have found is more complex than previously thought. Alexis Rosenfeld/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexis Rosenfeld/Getty Images

What are sperm whales saying? Researchers find a complex 'alphabet'

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Weliton Menário Costa (center) holds a laptop while surrounded by dancers for his music video, "Kangaroo Time." From left: Faux Née Phish (Caitlin Winter), Holly Hazlewood, and Marina de Andrade. Nic Vevers/ANU hide caption

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Nic Vevers/ANU

'Dance Your Ph.D.' winner on science, art, and embracing his identity

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Researchers in a rainforest in Indonesia spotted an injury on the face of a male orangutan they named Rakus. They were stunned to watch him treat his wound with a medicinal plant. Armas/Suaq Project hide caption

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Armas/Suaq Project

Joie Henney says his emotional support alligator, Wally, is missing in Georgia after being kidnapped, found and released into a swamp with some 20 other gators. Heather Khalifa/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP hide caption

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Heather Khalifa/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP